Your Morning Sickness Medication May Expose Your Unborn Baby to Birth Defects

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Your Morning Sickness Medication May Expose Your Unborn Baby to Birth Defects

As many as 90% of pregnant women experience some nausea during the early stages of pregnancy, and a small percentage of those women will experience vomiting during pregnancy that is so excessive it may result in dehydration, weight loss and other complications. Some of these women may seek help from the anti-nausea medication Zofran, marketed by GlaxoSmithKline “off-label” as a treatment for morning sickness, without realizing that the drug has never been approved as a morning sickness treatment, and may actually put their unborn baby at risk for severe birth defects. If you took Zofran during pregnancy and your child was born with a congenital malformation like cleft lip, cleft palate or a heart birth defect, contact a knowledgeable Zofran lawyer today for legal help.

Zofran Morning Sickness Lawsuit // Ford & Associates Nationwide

Zofran Not Approved for Use in Pregnancy

Zofran (ondansetron) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1991, as a treatment for nausea and vomiting among patients undergoing surgery or chemotherapy treatment. However, shortly after Zofran became available for consumer use, GlaxoSmithKline saw a whole new market for Zofran – pregnant women experiencing a severe form of morning sickness called hyperemesis gravidarum. This is despite the fact that Zofran has never been approved by the FDA for this use, nor has it been tested to determine whether Zofran is safe or effective for use during pregnancy. In fact, a growing number of studies have indicated that pregnant women who take Zofran may actually have a higher risk of giving birth to babies with serious birth defects.

Risk of Birth Defects from Zofran

One of the first studies to identify a potential connection between Zofran and birth defects in babies was conducted by researchers from Hong Kong and published in 2006. According to the findings of the study, Zofran is capable of crossing the human placenta in significant amounts when taken by pregnant women, and may interrupt the development of an unborn baby. Several other studies have examined the risk of birth defects allegedly associated with Zofran use in pregnancy, including research published in the journal Reproductive Toxicology in December 2014, which found that Zofran use during the first trimester of pregnancy doubled the risk of “hole in the heart” birth defects in babies, and increased the overall risk of birth defects by 62%.

Zofran Birth Defect Lawsuits

As more and more people across the United States become aware of the potential for Zofran use in pregnancy to cause serious birth defects, parents whose children were born with severe congenital malformations after being exposed to the anti-nausea drug in utero are pursuing legal claims against GlaxoSmithKline. All of the Zofran birth defect lawsuits involve similar allegations that the drug manufacturing company designed a defective medication, illegally marketed Zofran for unapproved uses, and failed to provide adequate warnings to consumers and the medical community about the alleged risk of Zofran birth defects in babies.

A Reputable Zofran Birth Defect Attorney Can Help

Court documents that have emerged in this new wave of Zofran lawsuits indicate that GlaxoSmithKline may have known as early as 1992 that Zofran was capable of posing an “unreasonable risk of harm” for unborn babies in the womb. If your child was born with a “hole in the heart” birth defect or another severe congenital malformation, and you believe Zofran to be the cause, consult an experienced Zofran attorney to discuss your legal options. You may have grounds to file a Zofran birth defect lawsuit against GlaxoSmithKline, in order to pursue the financial compensation you deserve for your child’s injuries, past and future medical bills, and emotional trauma.

Your Morning Sickness Medication May Expose Your Unborn Baby to Birth Defects  // Ford & Associates Nationwide

GlaxoSmithKline Faces Growing Number of Zofran Birth Defect Lawsuits

Zofran maker GlaxoSmithKline pushed its anti-nausea medication as an off-label treatment for morning sickness in pregnant women, which studies have shown may cause severe birth defects in babies, and now the drug maker is being accused of “experimenting with the lives of unsuspecting mothers-to-be and their babies” in a recent product liability lawsuit. If you took Zofran while pregnant, and your child was born with cleft lip, cleft palate, club foot, heart defects, or another congenital malformation, contact a knowledgeable Zofran birth defect lawyer today for legal help. You may have grounds to file a Zofran lawsuit against GSK, in order to pursue damages for your child’s birth defects and medical expenses.

GlaxoSmithKline Faces Growing Number of Zofran Birth Defect Lawsuits // Ford & Associates Nationwide

GSK Promoted Zofran Off-Label for Pregnant Women

While medical professionals are allowed to prescribe pharmaceutical drugs like Zofran for off-label uses, drug manufacturing companies are banned from marketing their products for uses that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). GlaxoSmithKline, however, has been accused of promoting Zofran off-label to relieve nausea and vomiting associated with a severe form of morning sickness called hyperemesis gravidarum, and in 2012, the drug maker agreed to pay $3 billion to settle claims by the U.S. Department of Justice that it marketed Zofran and other medications “in a manner that is false and misleading.”

In a new Zofran birth defect lawsuit filed against GlaxoSmithKline on October 29, the plaintiff Deanna Brown argues that the drug maker continued to promote Zofran as a morning sickness treatment, despite the fact that the FDA ordered GSK in 1999 to “immediately cease distribution” of ads that “promote Zofran in a manner that is false or misleading because it lacks fair balance.” In spite of these warnings, Brown claims, GSK turned Zofran into a blockbuster medication, with $1.4 billion in sales in 2002, by using a “fraudulent marketing campaign” that targeted pregnant women.

Zofran Lawsuits Over Congenital Malformations

The Zofran lawsuit filed by Deanna Brown, whose baby was born with birth defects after being exposed to Zofran in utero, joins a growing number of complaints brought against GlaxoSmithKline over congenital malformations allegedly caused by Zofran, which has never been approved for use among pregnant women. According to reports, as many as 193 Zofran lawsuits have been filed against GSK this year alone, with 16 of them brought on one day in late October in Alabama, and another 11 filed that same day in Boston. The complaints accuse GSK of expanding its Zofran sales by illegally advertising the anti-nausea drug as a treatment for morning sickness, despite the fact that it has never been proven safe or effective for this particular use.

Seeking Compensation for Zofran Birth Defects

In her Zofran lawsuit, Brown cites marketing material that she says GlaxoSmithKline provided to its sales employees in the early 1990s, directing them to “emphasize to medical providers not only the benefits of Zofran but also the financial benefits to the providers by prescribing Zofran.” In Deanna Brown’s case, her daughter was born with congenital band syndrome and club foot birth defects after she herself was prescribed Zofran during her first trimester of pregnancy, and is suing GSK now because she was not previously aware of the alleged link between Zofran and birth defects. As a result of her daughter’s birth defects, Brown is seeking damages for negligence, breach of express warranty, breach of implied warranty, product liability, and fraudulent misrepresentation and concealment, plus medical bills and attorneys’ fees.

Zofran Lawsuit Filed Over Baby’s Atrial Septal Heart Defect

Yet another product liability lawsuit has been filed against the maker of the controversial anti-nausea medication Zofran, by a mother from Kansas who alleges that side effects of the prescription drug caused her daughter to be born with an atrial septal heart defect. If you took Zofran during pregnancy as a morning sickness treatment, and your child was born with an atrial septal defect or another severe heart malformation, contact a reputable Zofran lawyer today for legal help. With an experienced Zofran attorney on your side, you can protect your legal rights and pursue the financial compensation your child deserves for his or her injuries.

 Zofran Lawsuit Filed Over Baby’s Atrial Septal Heart Defect // Ford & Associates Nationwide

Atrial Septal Defects from Zofran

The anti-nausea drug Zofran has been named in more than a dozen lawsuits brought against GlaxoSmithKline, which first introduced Zofran as an anti-nausea treatment for chemotherapy and surgery patients in 1991. This latest Zofran birth defect lawsuit was filed last week by Samantha Brosseau, on behalf of herself and her daughter, identified in the complaint as K.C. According to her Zofran complaint, K.C. was born with an atrial septal birth defect after being exposed to Zofran during the first trimester of pregnancy, when Samantha Brosseau was prescribed the anti-nausea drug off-label to relieve her morning sickness symptoms.

Lawsuits Filed Over Zofran Birth Complications

Brosseau’s Zofran lawsuit joins a growing number of birth defect complaints filed on behalf of infants and children across the country whose mothers took the anti-nausea medication during pregnancy, and were subsequently diagnosed with heart defects or other severe congenital malformations. All of the Zofran lawsuits involve similar allegations that GlaxoSmithKline failed to provide doctors and consumers with adequate warnings about the risk of birth defects allegedly associated with Zofran use in pregnancy, and illegally promoted Zofran off-label as a treatment for morning sickness, even though it was never approved by the FDA for that particular use.

Off-Label Zofran Marketing for Pregnant Women

“Although the only FDA approval for this drug was seriously ill patients, GSK marketed Zofran ‘off label’ since at least January 1998 as an established safe and effective treatment for the very common side effect of a normal pregnancy – pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting – otherwise known as ‘morning sickness,’” Brosseau’s lawsuit claims. “GSK further marketed Zofran during this time as a ‘wonder drug’ for pregnant women, despite having knowledge that GSK had never once undertaken a single study establishing that this powerful drug was safe or effective for pregnant mothers and their growing children in utero.”

Zofran Heart Birth Defects

According to Brosseau’s lawsuit, K.C. was born in November 2013 with an atrial septal defect, characterized by a hole in the heart that forms during the early stages of pregnancy, when the unborn baby is most susceptible to harm. In babies with an atrial septal defect, the hole is located in the wall that separates the two upper chambers of the heart, and allows oxygen-rich blood to leak into the oxygen-poor sections of the heart, forcing the heart and lungs to worker harder and possibly causing damage to the arteries.

Birth Defects Allegedly Linked to Zofran

There have been a number of studies conducted in recent years that have found a potential connection between Zofran use in pregnancy and atrial septal defects in babies, and, according to this Zofran lawsuit, “From 1992 to the present, GSK has received more than 200 reports of birth defects in children who were exposed to Zofran during pregnancy […] the most commonly reported birth defects [being] congenital heart defects.” Other birth complications possibly associated with an expectant mother’s use of Zofran while pregnant include cleft lip, cleft palate, kidney defects, fetal growth restriction, musculoskeletal malformations and fetal death.

Ventricular Septal Defect

When the development of an unborn baby is interrupted in utero by an outside factor, such as maternal use of a potentially dangerous pharmaceutical drug, the result may be a debilitating heart birth defect called a ventricular septal defect. Ventricular septal defects affect the formation of the heart during the early stages of pregnancy, and without treatment, the deformity can cause serious problems for the affected individual, during childhood or later in life. If your child was born with a “hole in the heart” birth defect like a ventricular septal defect, and you believe a pharmaceutical drug to be the cause, contact a knowledgeable birth defect lawyer today for legal help. You may have grounds to file a product liability lawsuit against the drug manufacturing company, in order to seek fair and timely reimbursement for your losses.

Ventricular Septal Defect Lawsuit // Ford & Associates

What is a Ventricular Septal Defect?

A ventricular septal defect (VSD) is a “hole in the heart” birth defect that is present at birth, and occurs when there is a hole in the wall that separates the lower chambers of the heart, allowing blood to pass from the left to the right side of the heart. As a result of the malformation, oxygen-rich blood then gets pumped back to the lungs rather than out to the rest of the body, which forces the heart to work harder to keep the tissues oxygenated and the organs working properly. Some common symptoms of a ventricular septal defect in babies include the following:

  • Fast breathing or breathlessness
  • Poor eating
  • Failure to thrive
  • Easy tiring
  • Failure to gain weight
  • Heart murmur

What Causes “Hole in the Heart” Birth Defects?

There is often no clear cause of a ventricular septal defect, but the congenital malformation arises from problems occurring early in the development of the heart, while the unborn baby is in the mother’s womb. A ventricular septal defect occurs during fetal development, when the muscular wall separating the left and right sides of the heart, or the septum, fails to form properly between the lower chambers of the heart, or the ventricles. There are several factors that may increase a baby’s risk of developing a ventricular septal defect during pregnancy, including the use of certain pharmaceutical drugs by expectant mothers. The following are some widely-used medications that research shows may make a baby more likely to suffer a ventricular septal defect, when taken during pregnancy:

  • Zofran (ondansetron) – An anti-nausea drug intended to treat cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy that is sometimes prescribed off-label to pregnant women experiencing severe morning sickness.
  • SSRI antidepressants – A powerful class of prescription medications commonly used to treat depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and other mood disorders.
  • Depakote (valproate) – A widely-used anticonvulsant drug commonly prescribed to treat epilepsy and prevent chronic migraine headaches in pregnant women.

Complications of Heart Birth Defects

A small ventricular septal defect may cause no problems for the affected individual, and some VSDs may even close on their own, without the need for intervention. However, larger VSDs can cause a wide range of disabilities, and typically require surgery early in life to prevent serious complications like pulmonary hypertension, endocarditis and other heart problems, such as abnormal heart rhythms and valve problems. Closing a large ventricular septal defect by open-heart surgery is usually done in infancy or childhood, even in patients with minor symptoms, to prevent potentially life-threatening complications later in life.

Contact a Knowledgeable Birth Defect Lawyer Today

According to the National Institutes of Health, ventricular septal defects are one of the most common congenital heart malformations, affecting between 30% and 60% of all newborns with a heart birth defect, or between two and six children per 1,000 births. However, when expectant mothers take certain pharmaceutical drugs while pregnant, the risk of ventricular septal defects and other heart birth defects may increase significantly. If you used a powerful medication like Depakote or Zofran during pregnancy, and your child has suffered a ventricular septal defect or another major congenital malformation, consult an experienced birth defect attorney to explore your possible compensation options. With a knowledgeable lawyer on your side, you can protect your legal rights and pursue the compensation your child deserves for his or her injuries.

Ventricular Septal Defect (a congenital heart defect) may be linked to infant exposure to Zofran, Depakote, or SSRI antidepressants (like Paxil or Zoloft) during pregnancy. // Ford & Associates

Atrial Septal Defect

An atrial septal defect is a major congenital malformation that affects the formation of a baby’s heart during fetal development, and may be more likely to occur in unborn babies exposed to certain pharmaceutical drugs in utero. If your baby was born with an atrial septal defect or another serious heart birth defect, and you believe a defective prescription or over-the-counter medication to be the cause, contact an experienced product liability lawyer today for legal help. You may be entitled to financial compensation for your child’s injuries, past and future medical expenses, and pain and suffering, which you can pursue by filing a birth defect lawsuit against the drug manufacturing company.

Atrial Septal Defect Lawsuit // Ford & Associates

Atrial Septal Defect Described

An atrial septal defect (ASD) is a “hole in the heart” birth defect characterized by a hole in the wall separating the two upper chambers of the heart, called atria. The malformation is congenital, or present from birth, and allows freshly oxygenated blood from the left atrium to mix with deoxygenated blood in the right atrium, or vice versa, which can result in decreased oxygen levels in the blood that supplies the brain, organs and tissues. Some of the most common symptoms of an atrial septal defect include:

  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath, especially when exercising
  • Frequent lung infections
  • Swelling of the abdomen, feet or legs
  • Heart palpitations or skipped beats
  • Stroke
  • Heart murmur

Possible Causes of Atrial Septal Defects

It is common knowledge that atrial septal defects present at birth are caused by problems occurring early in the heart’s development while the child is still in the womb. And, while there is often no clear cause of “hole in the heart” birth defects, a growing body of research has shown that the use of certain pharmaceutical drugs during pregnancy may increase an unborn baby’s risk of suffering severe birth defects, including atrial septal defects and ventricular septal defects. Some of the more popular prescription drugs that have been linked to an alleged increased risk of atrial septal defects in babies include the following:

  • Zofran (ondansetron) – A powerful anti-nausea medication sometimes prescribed to pregnant women struggling with severe morning sickness.
  • Depakote (valproate) – A popular anti-epileptic drug commonly used to treat epileptic seizures, migraine headaches and bipolar disorder.
  • Paxil (paroxetine) – An SSRI antidepressant drug used to treat depression, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and other psychiatric disorders.
  • Zoloft (sertraline) – An SSRI antidepressant prescribed to treat major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and other mood disorders.

Long-Term Effects of Hole in the Heart Birth Defects

Small atrial septal defects may cause no symptoms for affected individuals, and some may even close on their own during infancy or early childhood. However, large ASDs can cause damage to the heart and lungs, and may require surgery to prevent complications caused by the hole in the heart. In some cases, adults with an undetected atrial septal defect may have a shorter life span from problems like heart failure or pulmonary hypertension, high blood pressure that affects the arteries in the lungs. If the atrial septal defect is large, the extra blood volume caused by the heart pumping oxygen-rich blood to the lungs may overfill the lungs and overwork the heart, causing serious and potentially life-threatening complications, like right-sided heart failure, heart rhythm abnormalities and stroke.

Contact an Experienced Birth Defect Attorney

Like ventricular septal defects, atrial septal defects are relatively common birth defects, present in one child per 1,500 births, and the malformation actually makes up 30% to 40% of all congenital heart diseases that are seen in adults. If you took a prescription drug like Zofran, Depakote or Paxil during pregnancy, and your child was born with an atrial septal defect or another serious congenital heart malformation, consult a reputable birth defect attorney as soon as possible to discuss your legal options. With an experienced product liability lawyer on your side, you can ensure that your legal rights are protected, and seek fair and timely reimbursement for your child’s birth defect and any related medical expenses.

Atrial Septal Defect (a congenital heart defect) may be linked to infant exposure to Zofran, Depakote, or SSRI antidepressants (like Paxil or Zoloft) during pregnancy. // Ford & Associates

Cleft Palate Birth Defects

Babies born with cleft palate birth defects impairing their speech, eating habits and physical appearance may qualify for compensation if their congenital malformation was caused by their mother’s use of a prescription or over-the-counter medication during the early stages of pregnancy. If you took Depakote, Zofran, or another potentially harmful pharmaceutical drug while pregnant, and your child was born with a serious orofacial birth defect like cleft palate or cleft lip, consult an experienced product liability lawyer today for legal help. With a qualified birth defect attorney on your side, you can protect your legal rights and seek the financial compensation your child deserves for his or her physical injuries, ongoing medical bills, and emotional trauma.

Cleft Palate Lawsuit // Ford & Associates

Cleft Palate Described

Cleft palate is a facial and oral birth defect that occurs during the early stages of pregnancy, when there is not enough tissue in the mouth area during fetal development, which prevents the roof of the mouth from forming properly in the womb. The roof of the mouth, or palate, is formed between the sixth and ninth weeks of pregnancy, and when the development of the fetus is interrupted during this time, a cleft palate birth defect may occur. A cleft palate is characterized by a split or opening in the roof of the mouth that affects the bony front portion of the palate, the soft back portion, or both. Cleft palate birth defects are sometimes accompanied by cleft lip, a malformation characterized by a physical split or separation in one or both sides of the upper lip that can extend beyond the base of the nose and affect the bones of the upper gum and/or upper jaw.

Medications Tied to Cleft Palate Birth Defects

In many cases of cleft lip and cleft palate birth defects, the cause of the oral malformation is unknown. However, extensive research has shown that certain medications taken by expectant mothers during the first trimester of pregnancy may significantly increase their risk of giving birth to babies with congenital malformations, like cleft palate. Among the medicines allegedly linked to cleft palate and cleft lip birth defects in babies are:

  • Depakote (valproate) – An anticonvulsant medication prescribed to treat epileptic seizures, migraine headaches and bipolar disorder
  • Zofran (ondansetron) – An anti-nausea medication sometimes prescribed off-label to pregnant women experiencing severe morning sickness
  • Paxil (paroxetine) – An SSRI antidepressant drug used to treat major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Zoloft (sertraline) – An SSRI antidepressant drug prescribed to treat depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and other mental health problems

Long-Term Complications of Cleft Palate Defects

In addition to causing physical deformities, cleft palate and cleft lip birth defects can also result in long-term complications for affected babies, caused by the malformation of the palate and/or lip. Some babies born with oral clefts experience problems with eating, due to the fact that a separation in the palate can allow food and liquids to pass from the mouth back through the nose, and others have problems with speech, ear infections and hearing loss. In some cases, oral clefts may be linked to dental problems, and children born with cleft palate may be prone to a larger than average number of cavities, and may even have extra, malformed, missing or displaced teeth. In order to address the myriad medical and oral health problems linked to cleft lip and cleft palate birth defects, treatment usually involves a team of doctors and specialists, including a plastic surgeon, a dentist, an orthodontist, an oral surgeon, a speech pathologist, an audiologist and a speech therapist, among others.

Contact an Experienced Birth Defect Lawyer Today

According to statistics, cleft lip, with or without cleft palate, affects one in 700 babies every year, and is the fourth most common congenital malformation in the United States. However, in babies whose mothers take pharmaceutical drugs like Depakote or Zofran while pregnant, the risk of cleft lip and cleft palate birth defects may increase dramatically. If your child was born with a major birth defect like cleft palate, and you believe Zofran, Depakote, or another prescription medication to be the cause, contact a knowledgeable birth defect attorney as soon as possible to discuss your legal options. You may be entitled to financial compensation for your child’s injuries, pain and suffering, and past and future medical expenses, which you can pursue by filing a birth defect claim against the drug manufacturing company.

Cleft Palate & Cleft Lip may be linked to infant exposure to Zofran, Depakote, or SSRI antidepressants (like Paxil or Zoloft) during pregnancy. // Ford & Associates

Clubfoot Birth Defects

Unborn babies developing in the womb are exceptionally vulnerable to harm caused by outside factors, particularly prescription or over-the-counter medications taken by expectant mothers during the early stages of pregnancy. Research has shown that babies born to women who take powerful pharmaceutical drugs, like Depakote or Zofran, while pregnant, may have a significantly increased risk of developing club foot birth defects and other debilitating congenital malformations. If your child was born with clubfoot, and you believe Zofran, Depakote, or another potentially dangerous medication to be the cause, contact a knowledgeable drug injury lawyer today for legal help. You and your child may be entitled to financial compensation for your losses, which you can pursue by filing a product liability lawsuit against the drug manufacturing company.

Clubfoot Lawsuit // Ford & Associates

What is Club Foot?

The term club foot, or clubfoot, describes a range of physical abnormalities present at birth (congenital) that affect the formation of a baby’s foot or feet, in which the foot is twisted out of shape or position. Club foot occurs when the tendons connecting the muscles to the bone are shorter than usual, causing the foot to be positioned at a sharp angle to the ankle, much like the head of a golf club. Babies born with clubfoot typically exhibit the following symptoms:

  • The top of their foot is twisted downward and inward
  • Their foot is turned so severely that it appears to be upside down
  • The calf muscles in the affected leg are underdeveloped
  • The affected foot is up to a ½-inch shorter than the other foot

What Causes Club Foot Birth Defects?

In many cases of club foot birth defects, the cause of the malformation is unknown. However, a number of studies have shown that expectant mothers who take certain medications while pregnant may have an increased risk of giving birth to babies with club foot and other congenital defects. Some popular pharmaceutical drugs that have been linked to club foot birth defects in babies include the following:

  • Zofran (ondansetron) – An anti-nausea drug sometimes prescribed off-label to pregnant women suffering from severe morning sickness
  • Depakote (valproate) – An anticonvulsant drug commonly prescribed to treat epileptic seizures, manic episodes of bipolar disorder, and severe migraine headaches
  • Zoloft (sertraline) – An SSRI antidepressant drug prescribed to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders and other mental health problems
  • Paxil (paroxetine) – An SSRI antidepressant drug used to treat major depressive disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder

Children born with club foot birth defects typically have difficulty walking normally, which is why doctors recommend treating the malformation soon after birth. Furthermore, club foot defects present at birth can be a red flag for additional medical problems, as the malformation can be linked to other more severe birth defects, like spina bifida, which occurs when the tissue surrounding the baby’s spinal cord fails to close properly during fetal development.

Long-Term Effects of Club Foot Birth Defects

Club foot birth defects can range from mild to severe, and while the club foot itself typically doesn’t cause any serious complications in newborn babies, it’s when the child learns to stand and walk that the problems may begin. At this point, children afflicted with clubfoot birth defects may experience difficulties walking normally, and may walk on the sides of their feet or even on the tops of their feet, due to the malformation. As a result of these walking adjustments, club foot may lead to problems with callouses or sores developing on the feet, may prevent the natural growth of the calf muscles, may cause arthritis in the joints, and may ultimately lead to an awkward gait.

A Skilled Birth Defect Lawyer Can Help

Club foot is a relatively common birth defect affecting approximately one in 1,000 babies born in the United States each year. However, statistics show that the risk of clubfoot and other debilitating birth defects may be considerably higher in babies exposed to certain pharmaceutical drugs in utero. If you took Zofran, Depakote, Paxil, Zoloft, or another potent prescription medication while pregnant, and your child was born with a congenital malformation like club foot, consult an experienced birth defect attorney today to explore your possible compensation options. With a reputable and compassionate product liability lawyer on your side, you can protect your legal rights and pursue the financial compensation your child deserves for his injuries, medical bills, and pain and suffering.

Clubfoot may be linked to infant exposure to Zofran, Depakote, or SSRI antidepressants (like Paxil or Zoloft) during pregnancy. // Ford & Associates